Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Child Development/Interests/Information Research

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Research

http://www.webmd.com/parenting/guide/4-to-5-year-old-milestones

4- to 5-Year-Old Development: Language and Cognitive Milestones

Your curious and inquisitive child is better able to carry on a conversation. In addition, your child's vocabulary is growing -- as is his or her thought process. Not only is your child able to answer simple questions easily and logically, but he or she should be able to express feelings better.
Most children at this age enjoy singing, rhyming, and making up words. They are energetic, silly, and, at times, rowdy and obnoxious.
Other language and cognitive milestones your child may achieve in the coming year include being able to:
  • Speak clearly using more complex sentences
  • Count ten or more objects
  • Correctly name at least four colors and three shapes
  • Recognize some letters and possibly write his or her name
  • Better understand the concept of time and the order of daily activities, like breakfast in the morning, lunch in the afternoon, and dinner at night
  • Have a greater attention span
  • Follow two- to three-part commands. For example, "Put your book away, brush your teeth, and then get in bed."
  • Recognize familiar words, such as "STOP"
  • Know his or her address and phone number, if taught

4- to 5-Year-Old Development: Movement Milestones and Hand and Finger Skills

Children learn through play, and that is what your 4- to 5-year-old should be doing. At this age, your child should be running, hopping, throwing and kicking balls, climbing, and swinging with ease.
Other movement milestones and hand and finger skills your child may achieve in the coming year include being able to:

  • Stand on one foot for more than 9 seconds
  • Do a somersault and hop
  • Walk up and down stairs without help
  • Walk forward and backwards easily
  • Peddle a tricycle
  • Copy a triangle, circle, square, and other shapes
  • Draw a person with a body
  • Stack 10 or more blocks
  • Use a fork and spoon
  • Dress and undress, brush teeth, and take care of other personal needs without much help


http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/positiveparenting/middle2.html
Thinking and Learning
Children in this age group might:
  • Face more academic challenges at school.
  • Become more independent from the family.
  • Begin to see the point of view of others more clearly.
  • Have an increased attention span.

Healthy Bodies

  • Provide plenty of fruits and vegetables; limit foods high in solid fats, added sugars, or salt, and prepare healthier foods for family meals.
  • Keep television sets out of your child's bedroom. Limit screen time, including computers and video games, to no more than 1 to 2 hours.
  • Encourage your child to participate in an hour a day of physical activities that are age appropriate and enjoyable and that offer variety! Just make sure your child is doing three types of activity: aerobic activity like running, muscle strengthening like climbing, and bone strengthening – like jumping rope – at least three days per week.

Children are constantly becoming more and more aware of the technology around them. Based on these stats on health and growth children by the age of 5-10 are pretty aware and capable of many things. Children, in the modern world, also understand swiping, moving, holding, dragging, dropping, etc. It is not an outrageous claim that kids will be able to understand a simple map and activities/gmes to go along with it. 


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