Wednesday, October 16, 2013

The Reading


  • Context
    •  Context is everything! It is a huge part of typography and communicating a message.
    • context is the set of condition and circumstances present at any given time in any given place.
    • Includes:
      • motives and abilities of makers and readers
      • the material nature of artifacts
      • the particulars of delivery
    • Ask six questions
      • who initiates the work?
      • who are the readers?
      • what is the artifacts?
      • how is the artifact manifested?
      • where does the delivery take place?
      • when does the delivery take place?
    • The Initiator
      • each individual's system can be compared to an orbit with gravitational pull.
      • designers and architects must work in several orbits though
      • A typographers orbit pulls in many different topics, projects, and has a foot in a majority of the world's messages
    • The Reader
      • it is important for a type designer to have a very clear idea of who their readers are
      • also referred to as the audience
      • we must understand the reader if we want our type to be understood
      • readers have their own language
    • The Artifact and Delivery
      • Lots of questions need to be asked, (i.e. What is the artifact? is it printed or projected? where does the delivery take place? etc.)
      • distance format (what), a certain medium (how), a singular place (where), span of time (when)
      • good positioning, subtlety, organization, and even the weight of text are all important for delivery
      • technological and physical systems govern the material nature of the typography
      • reading systems constrain the size and placement of typographic elements 

  • Readers
  • The public context
    • typographic production for reading is typically aimed at a "public"
    • a mass of individuals
    • type - whether delivered on a home computer screen or on a theatre billboard does not care about the details of a reader's background or personality. typography addresses readers as participants and as members of groups within larger cultures
  • The personal context
    • Preference is when a reader chooses to read a sign or type instead of other type
    • it might deal with them personally or stick out to them
    • all readers look at something different, CNN example
  • The global context
    • even when translation is accomplished, "others" interpret meanings through their own layers of cultural and personal experience
    • when going from culture to culture, the message is already at risk
  • Visual competition
    • magazines next to each other on a newsstand have more competition than text at the entrance of an exhibition.
    • Latin names at the botanical gardens example
  • Reader orientation
    • Luecke
  • Point of delivery
    • involves what, where, when, and how readers see typography
    • another condition to consider is how much time someone has to read a sign
    • less time readers have to access content, the faster the speed of delivery
    • means of delivery, also known as the artifact, compounds the conditions that typographers have to consider


  • Primer
  • all definitions written in my notebook here are some that stood out though
    • ambiguity - the ability of typography to express more than one possible meaning or to invite inference beyond the literal meaning of the word
    • ligature - single typographic character combining two or more letters
    • referent - the thing that a word or sign stands for
    • rhetoric - the art of argumentation and discourse

Saying and Playing
  • letters and words dressed in typography are minor and major players
  • logotypes
  • 1. will our type sit uselessly
  • 2.a host of other details can make all the difference between a lackluster and an irresistible production
  • 3. interpret and give form to the words
  • adjust characteristics, color, weight,
  • serifs, weights, curves, wield communicative power

  • Rhetorically Speaking
    • pronouncements, one liners on billboards
    • assign formal qualities to both mirror the writers intentions and fulfill the readers expectations for such writing
  • Visual semantics
    • linguistics, study of speech and writing function
    • "visual language"
    • semantics - concerns how people use signs, symbols, and style
    • syntax - arrangement of words
    • pragmatics - how people understand what is being said or written
  • Semantics and syntax
    • typographic syntax must correspond with linguistic syntax!!!
    • through visual composition
  • Semantics and syntax of Hierarchy
    • book covers are riddled with hierarchy
    • text placement and emphasis are two major parts of a type that need to be considered
    • text is different when it gets on screen, first become last.



No comments:

Post a Comment